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PROTON Green Mobility Challenge 2012

PGMC2012 is an initiative of PROTON, together with Agensi Inovasi Malaysia, to promote electric vehicles. Teams compete to build the best performing EV based on a standard 2nd generation Proton Saga.

Day 2: Fastest Time & V-Max

In the afternoon, two challenges were held together: Challenge 2: Fastest Time for 2 Laps and Challenge 3: V-Max

Day 2: Pit Walk

In between Challenge 1 and Challenge 2 & 3, the organisers provided some time for a pit walk session. Spectators are allowed to go into the pits to mix with team members and look closely at the electric cars.

Day 2: Quarter Mile Acceleration

The second day is the day of 'performance' challenges. It started with the scrutinising and safety inspection of the cars. Then, Challenge 1: Quarter Mile Acceleration starts.

Day 1: Pit Display

While most of the team work on the car, some members focused on sprucing up the pit. This is because there are also prizes on team identity and pit display.

Day 1: Registration & Practice

It's October 5th, and finally, we're in SIC. The first day started with the registration and scrutinising of all 10 cars by the PGMC 2012 TC. Only four team members were allowed to be present during the inspection.

Battery Management System

When using batteries as the power source, a battery management system (BMS) is very important. We use the Orion Li-Ion BMS.

Chargers

As an electric vehicle, the batteries used in the car has to be charged from time to time. The 12 V lead-acid car battery also has to be charged while the car is running.

Thermal Imaging

In order to get an idea of where the hottest and coolest parts of the components might be, we made use of a thermal imager.

Saga Model Incompatibility

When PROTON initially gave us the car, it was a Saga BLM 1.3 model. However for this competition, PROTON then decides to standardise the cars, based on the Saga BLM 1.6 model.

Controller Programming

The motor controller given to us was preprogrammed. To win a race however, one has to evaluate the objective of the race and tune the controller accordingly.

Track Familiarization Day

On 17 September, teams were again invited to the Sepang International Circuit, where the challenge will be held, for driver circuit familiarization.

Thermal Management

Thermal management consists of the management of heat dissipation of the motor, motor controller and lithium-ion batteries with different methods.

Test Drive

The I.C.E. Terminator EV is moving!

Completing The Circuit

With the new electric engine in place, we reconnect all the wires and install the vacuum pump. Put the tyres back on and it's system go.

Mounting

We have had some problem with adapting the transmission to fit the motor and the car. But finally, we got the parts together and mounted the new electric engine.

Battery Compartment

For the purpose of safety and thermal management, the batteries must be enclosed in some sort of compartment.

Component Assembly

The concept of ICEV to EV conversion is simple enough where the original engine is to be replaced with the electric motor provided by the organizer.

Third Progress Update

Following the previous visit, PROTON and the PGMC2012 Technical Committee visit the teams again for the third progress update. They visited us on 14 August.

In-Car Wiring

Now that the car and its electrical engine system are together in the EV Lab, the wiring of the two can be integrated together.

Saturday, 29 September 2012

Saga Model Incompatibility

When PROTON initially gave us the car, it was a Saga BLM 1.3 model. However for this competition, PROTON then decides to standardise the cars, based on the Saga BLM 1.6 model. Consequently, we received a 1.6 model gearbox with all necessary accompanying parts. Following that, we un-mounted the 1.3 engine and gearbox and installed the new gearbox fitted with the induction motor into the engine bay. During the installation, we have some difficulty putting in the gearbox into the engine bay because the forward mounting part of the gear did not match properly between the chassis and the gearbox. To overcome this we had to modify that part by drilling a new bolt hole.

Besides that, we had other problems, mainly related to the electrical system. Since the car is a 1.3 model and the gearbox is of 1.6 model, there are some electrical incompatibility between both components. Firstly, the speedometer sensor which is an integrated part of the gearbox had 3-pin output instead of 2-pin output for the 1.3 model. So we might have to find an out-of-the-box solution and use a GPS device instead. Another issue is the reverse sensor. Between the two models, both of them have 2-pin output but with different port shape. To solve this we have to change the port from 1.6 model to 1.3 model by cutting the wiring port from the 1.3 model.

Speed sensor: 1.3 (top) vs. 1.6 (bottom)

Reverse sensor: 1.3 (blue) vs. 1.6 (black)

Thursday, 27 September 2012

Controller programming

The motor controller given to us was preprogrammed. We can just wire it in and run it, and we did. To win a race however, one has to evaluate the objective of the race and tune the controller accordingly.

We have tried three ways of reprogramming the controller:
  1. WinVCL. This software is perhaps the most powerful option, and certainly provides a way to implement unique and complex vehicle control functions. This program however requires the controller-specific operating system file.
  2. PC Programming Station (1314). This software offers programming, diagnostic, and test capabilities for the controller. It is a simple yet effective way to set up the initial parameters or changing them.
  3. Handheld programmer (1311). This programmer has the advantage of being more portable, and can be used to made adjustments in the field. It is however the most restrictive in terms of features available.
PC Programming Station
WinVCL
Both WinVCL and 1314 need this 1309 interface
Handheld programmer

Wednesday, 19 September 2012

Track Familiarization Day

On 17 September, teams were again invited to the Sepang International Circuit, where the challenge will be held, for driver circuit familiarization. Previously, teams were brought on a bus tour. This time, PROTON provided several cars for team drivers to drive themselves.

The day started with a short briefing, focusing on the SIC track and racing flag system (PDF). Then, it's time to suit up and get to the track. And prepare for the heat (no air-conditioning allowed!).

Our drivers, Zul and Nazmi
One lap behind the marshall
Solo test drive
Drag race

Drivers photo shoot

Wednesday, 12 September 2012

Thermal Management

Thermal management consists of the management of heat dissipation of the motor, motor controller and lithium-ion batteries with different methods. Motor cooling is planned to be done by the existing radiator fan which turns on and off with set temperature. Motor controller cooling, on the other hand, is done through heat sink and also direct airflow while the car is moving.

Battery thermal management is considered the most critical aspect of all thermal issues in an EV. Our concept is to use forced air cooling where the flow of air is guided into the battery compartment and forced out by a series of blowers or fans. Temperature distribution around the batteries is being studied and additional cooling method can be considered accordingly.

Controller gets a heat sink
Radiator fan cools motor
Battery fans

Friday, 7 September 2012

Test Drive

The I.C.E. Terminator EV is moving!

video
video

Thursday, 6 September 2012

Completing The Circuit

With the new electric engine in place, we reconnect all the wires and install the vacuum pump. Put the tyres back on and it's system go.

 

video

Tuesday, 4 September 2012

Mounting

We have had some problem with adapting the transmission to fit the motor and the car. But finally, we got the parts together and mounted the new electric engine.



The result?

icelogofinale


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